The Best Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

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If you’re in the market for furniture, don’t miss out on Wayfair’s epic Memorial Day sale. They’re offering up to 70% off, plus they have a limited time flash deals section where you can score extra discounts before the time runs out.

Below, shop our best finds from with sale, with extra items from the fan-favorite Kelly Clarkson’s Wayfair line.

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You Can’t Miss These Finds From Kohl’s Epic Memorial Day Sale

We love the texture of this beige area rug with black tassels. Place it in your living room or bedroom. 

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

If you need clothing storage, look no further than this garment rack. It has wood shelves for that mixed material look. 

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

Add a French country feel with this solid wood armchair. It has a traditional nailhead trim.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

If you’ve always wanted a KitchenAid stand mixer, here’s your shot. It has 10 speeds and comes in a white that matches any kitchen.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

We’re obsessed with these special dining chairs in a whitewashed hue. The caned back is super on-trend.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

Who says your desk lamp has to be basic? This option makes a statement.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

This freestanding full-length mirror adds a touch of glam. It has a wood frame covered in linen with nail-head accents.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

Add some midcentury flair with this coffee table. Its legs come in a gold finish.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

This neutral sectional will fit into your space perfectly. It comes with five accent pillows for you to play around with.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

How beautiful is this solid pine wood bed? We love the attention to detail, from its scalloped base to its arched top.

EComm: TK Finds From Wayfair's Memorial Day Sale

Looking for more Memorial Day deals? These are the best sales from A to Z.

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Metal detectorist finds coin worth £7,000 from over 1,000 years ago

Metal detectorist finds rare coin worth £7,000 from the three-year reign of the boy king Edward the Martyr over 1,000 years ago

  • A coin from the reign of Edward the Martyr has been found on the Isle of Wight 
  • The silver penny, worth £7,000, was unearthed by a metal detectorist in a field
  • Edward was only 13 when he was crowned king after the death of father Edgar
  • The Saxon coin was found five inches down by a retired council worker, 68

A rare coin from the short reign of the boy king Edward the Martyr over 1,000 years ago has been found by a metal detectorist – and it’s worth £7,000.

The silver penny was unearthed in a field on the Isle of Wight by the amateur treasure hunter.

The Saxon coin depicts the head of Edward the Martyr who was only 13-years-old when he was crowned king after the death of his father Edgar in 975AD.

A rare coin from the short reign of the boy king Edward the Martyr 1,000 years ago has been found by a metal detectorist on the Isle of Wight

He ruled England for three years before being assassinated in 978AD by supporters of his half-brother Aethelred.

The Saxon coin was found buried five inches down by a 68-year-old retired council worker who was on a club rally at the time.

The lucky finder, who is remaining anonymous, scraped off the mud to reveal the bust of Edward wearing a diadem and facing left.

On one side of the silver penny are the words ‘EDPEARD REX ANGLORX’ which translates as ‘Edward king of the English.

On the reverse is a small cross in the centre with the words ‘AELSTAN M’O CANT’ – Aelfstan moneyer of Canterbury – written around the edge.

There were 39 mints operating around the country at the time with three moneyers working at Canterbury.

Very few coins are known to survive from Edward’s reign, making the piece incredibly collectible for enthusiasts.

It has been consigned for sale with specialist auctioneers Dix Noonan Webb of London.

The Saxon coin was found buried five inches down by a 68-year-old retired council worker during a club rally

Jim Brown, coin specialist at Dix Noonan Webb, said: ‘With coins of this nature their value depends on two things – their rarity and their condition.

‘In this case we are lucky enough to have both so we would expect a fair bit of interest in it for sure.

‘It was found on the Isle of Wight but there is no indication of how it got there or anything like that.

‘There are number of possibilities as this was a time of quite a lot of trade between Britain and the continent so it may have been on it’s way to Europe to pay for something there.’

Edward was the son of King Edgar and his first wife, Aethelflaed.

The Saxon coin depicts the head of Edward the Martyr who was only 13-years-old when he was crowned king after the death of his father Edgar in 975AD

Although he was crowned king upon his father’s death in 975, some, including Edgar’s second wife Aelfthryth, supported his half-brother, Aethelred II.

On March 18, 978 Edward was en route to meet with Aethelred and Aelfthryth he was pulled from his horse in Corfe Castle, Dorset and murdered by their supporters.

He was hastily buried in nearby Wareham.

Edward was venerated as a saint and martyr after his death and his body was exhumed and taken to a shrine at Shaftesbury Abbey in 1001.

The shrine was lost during the dissolution of the monasteries in the 16th century, but his bones were rediscovered in 1931 and now reside at a shrine in the Russian Orthodox Church in Brookwood, Surrey.

The sale takes place on April 22.  

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AI tool finds 3 coronavirus signs that often lead to a severe case

The novel coronavirus outbreak is far from being under control, with COVID-19 ravaging several countries at the moment. The US alone has accounted for nearly 175,000 cases of the more than 818,000 cases worldwide at the time of this writing. Italy is topping the casualty list with over 11,500 deaths and a fatality rate of 11.39%. Social distancing measures and good hygiene habits should significantly flatten the curve, but the results won’t be seen for several more weeks. The lower the curve, the less crowded the hospitals will be. That way, the severe COVID-19 cases will have a better chance of surviving the disease, which still lacks an effective treatment or vaccine.

Several such drugs are in testing, with some of them showing promise in limited trials. Plenty of vaccines are in the works as well, with at least two trials already underway. But there might be another untapped resource that could help doctors create therapies that could assist critical COVID-19 patients: Artificial intelligence. A new study shows that AI has been able to highlight three COVID-19 symptoms that are indicative of severe COVID-19 complications. Interestingly enough, it’s not the most common coronavirus symptoms that signal rapid deterioration after infection. If the discovery can be scaled up to more patients, it could potentially save more lives in the months ahead.

You’ve heard it a hundred times before, but COVID-19 has no universal symptoms. If you’re experiencing a fever, coughing and shortness of breath, you might be infected. But first, you have to rule out the flu. Other common symptoms may include throat pain and fatigue. Also, doctors observed that some patients reported a loss of smell and taste, which is the only COVID-19 symptom that really stands out. But many people who contract the virus will not show any symptoms at all, or at worst will simply experience mild discomfort.

According to a new study, only one of these symptoms can be indicative of severe disease, but only when combined with two other signs which require hospitalization. Per AFP, researchers from the US and China used AI to analyze data from 53 coronavirus patients across two hospitals in Wenzhou, China.

The algorithms discovered three changes in the body that precipitate severe illness: Body aches, levels of enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and hemoglobin levels. ALT is a liver enzyme that’s tested to measure liver function and diagnose liver failure. Hemoglobin testing is part of the standard blood work you get when admitted to the hospital.

The AI figured out these three features were the most accurate at predicting a severe COVID-19 case. The algorithm showed a 70 percent-80 percent accuracy at predicting the risk of acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is the COVID-19 complication that fills the lungs with fluid and kills some 50 percent of patients who get it.

Other symptoms, including particular patterns in lung imaging, fever and strong immune responses, were not useful at predicting whether a mild case could worsen to ARDS:

The model highlights that some pieces of clinical data may be underappreciated by clinicians, such as mild increases in ALT and hemoglobin as well as myalgias. Key characteristics predictive of diagnosis, including fever, lymphopenia, chest imaging, were not as predictive of severity. Likewise epidemiologic risks such as age and gender were not as predictive; all ARDS patients in this study were male but most males did not develop ARDS.

“It’s been fascinating because a lot of the data points that the machine used to help influence its decisions were different than what a clinician would normally look at,” physician and professor at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine Megan Coffee told AFP.

The team is looking to further refine the data and the AI tool might be ready to deploy sometime in April. The full study is available in Computers, Materials & Continua.

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