Italian restaurant has locals 'disgusted' after it held a garden party

Revellers waiting for their takeaway at an Italian restaurant dance and down pints together at DJ garden party before it is broken up by police

  • Revellers drink, dance and hug one another during party at Wakefield restaurant
  • Police were called to Capri @ The Vine on Monday, which had hired a DJ
  • Local landlady Sam Carney warns beer could been beyond its sell by date  

Police had to break up revellers at an Italian restaurant who were filmed dancing, downing pints and hugging one another with a DJ playing in the background. 

Punters were filmed on the terrace outside Capri @ The Vine in Wakefield on Monday, after it opened its doors to serve take away meals.  

But the bosses also hired a DJ and served alcohol to customers who partied together for hours, hugging and dancing despite the two metre social distancing warnings. 

Capri @ The Vine told social media followers it was serving take away meals, along with drinks, and announced it had hired a DJ for the Bank Holiday

Locals are furious after footage emerged from the party, with one neighbour saying she was ‘disgusted’. 

Sam Carney, 50, the landlady of the nearby Travellers Inn said: ‘I have had to close my pub for 70 days now and my staff are furloughed, so I am livid at what the Vine has done.

‘They hired a DJ and they were serving alcohol to people who were getting drunk and dancing together.

‘The customers were not just having a drink whilst they waited for their take away meal, some were there for hours.’  

West Yorkshire Police were called out to the restaurant on Monday evening and say they have referred the incident to the local licensing team

Locals say they are ‘disgusted’ by the footage

Police were called to finally break up the beer garden mayhem, but locals and publicans are fuming the restaurant flouted the coronavirus lockdown guidance.

Mrs Carney also claimed the beer being served would probably have been beyond its sell by date as she has a cellar full or out of date kegs and brewers are not kegging beer at the moment. 

Footage from the party has been shared on social media, prompting a furious response from some users. 

Char Button wrote: ‘Couldn’t be more disgusted with Capri at The Vine right now – a party, with a DJ, really? Surely they’re not legally allowed to open. How is this in any way acceptable?

‘This used to be my favourite eatery. No more. My husband can’t work, my child can’t go to school and I’m in danger of losing my little cafe because we are struggling to make ends meet.

‘Then Capri goes and does this. Reckless endangerment. They should bloody well be ashamed of themselves. All to make a quick buck! Our country is never coming out of this mess at this rate.’

Another enraged local Steven Tebb said: ‘We are all making sacrifices to keep the country safe and this selfish business is holding a disco and serving up pints as if it was just any other Bank Holiday Monday.’

West Yorkshire Police confirmed they were called to a gathering on the restaurant’s terrace at around 8pm on Monday.  

A spokesman from the force said: ‘The owner advised police they had been selling food to take away and some people had also bought beer.

Advertising their take away meals on Monday morning, Capri @ The Vine told followers ‘this is not an invitation to a social gathering, so don’t get any ideas’

‘Those present were advised to leave and the matter was referred to licensing.’

Nobody was available to comment from Capri, however an post from the day of the party shows it was inviting people to its restaurant.

The post read: ‘Pop up take out drinks on bank holiday Monday including a pint – whilst you wait for your take away or passing on your daily exercise.

‘The two metre rule applies and if there is a queue the we might even entertain you with some tunes! No standing around for a natter but what a feeling to have a pint from the tap again.’

The Capri added: ‘This is not an invitation to a social gathering so don’t get any ideas.’

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Pompeo says US will begin reimposing sanctions on Iran

Tensions between the US and Iran appear to be ratcheting up again after the international community paused typical foreign affairs to battle the coronavirus pandemic.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Wednesday the United States would begin reimposing sanctions on foreign companies doing business with Iran on its nuclear sites, giving countries 60 days to wind down their operations.

In a statement, the nation’s top diplomat accused the Iranian regime of continuing what he called “its nuclear brinkmanship by expanding proliferation sensitive activities,” arguing that he could not justify renewing a sanctions waiver that had been in place beyond the 60-day wind-down period.

The move will impact companies from Russia, China and the EU three, also known as France, Germany and Italy, which will now have two months to convert these nuclear facilities for peaceful purposes, Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation Chris Ford told reporters after the department’s decision was announced.

For its part, Iran called on the White House to lift sanctions in an effort to help stop the spread of coronavirus back in April.

In response, the State Department asserted that all sanctions on the Middle Eastern country were unrelated to coronavirus response efforts.

“We have repeatedly said that US sanctions do not impede the Iranian regime’s response to the Covid-19 crisis,” State Department spokesman Morgan Ortagus said at the time.

The department also accused Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of flatly rejecting an offer from the US for humanitarian assistance at the time.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani denied this claim, saying, “American leaders are lying…If they want to help Iran, all they need to do is to lift sanctions…Then we can deal with the coronavirus outbreak.”

The same day as Pompeo’s latest sanctions announcement, Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps unveiled over 100 missile-launching speedboats which it said would boost the country’s naval power and allow them to challenge US naval power in the Gulf.

“Today we announce that wherever the Americans are, we’re right there beside you, and in the near future you will sense us even more,” Iranian Naval Commander Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said at the unveiling ceremony, according to the Xinhua news agency.

“Defense is our logic in war but not in the sense of passivity against the enemy,” IRGC Chief Commander Hossein Salami added during his remarks.

Tensions between Tehran and Washington have spiked since President Trump withdrew the US from the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.

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Andrew Cuomo bizarrely brings out Chris Rock and Rosie Perez for daily coronavirus briefing – The Sun

NEW York Gov Andrew Cuomo bizarrely brought out Rosie Perez and Chris Rock during his daily coronavirus briefing on Thursday.

Perez and Rock both joined the governor on stage in the Brooklyn borough of New York City to promote wearing face masks.

Perez and Rock joined Cuomo for his daily update in Brooklyn, the actors' home borough. They say wearing a mask isn't just about protection, but also respect for others. Cuomo announced an executive order authorizing businesses in New York to deny entry to people who are not wearing face coverings.

The actors, who are both from Brooklyn, said wearing a mask isn't just about protection — but also about showing respect for others who could be at risk for coronavirus.

Cuomo announced during the briefing that he signed an executive order on Thursday that authorizes businesses to deny entry to those who aren't wearing a facial covering or mask.

More to follow…

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World’s oldest man Bob Weighton dies in Hampshire from cancer aged 112 – The Sun

THE world's oldest man has died aged 112 from cancer.

Bob Weighton, from Alton, Hants, was given the title by Guinness World Records in March this year after the death of Japanese 112-year-old Chitetsu Watanabe.

He was born in 1908 in Hull lived through the Spanish flu, both World Wars, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the invention of the internet.

More to follow…

For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online.

Thesun.co.uk is your go to destination for the best celebrity news, football news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video.

Download our fantastic, new and improved free App for the best ever Sun Online experience. For iPhone click here, for Android click here. 

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Maxine Waters blames Trump for ‘cops killing black people’ and says cop who knelt on George Floyd ‘enjoyed doing it’ – The Sun

REP Maxine Waters has shockingly blamed President Donald Trump for “cops killing black people” — days after George Floyd died in police custody.

Waters, a Democrat from California who frequently launches wild attacks at Trump, told TMZ she thinks the Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin, who was filmed with his neck on Floyd’s knee, “enjoyed doing it.” Trump on Wednesday called the death "very sad and tragic".

Video from Monday night shows Chauvin holding Floyd, a 46-year-old who was suspected of using a forged check at a deli, down with his knee on his neck and his other knee in the middle of his back.

Floyd repeatedly said “I can’t breathe,” but Chauvin continued to pin him to the ground.

Minutes later, Floyd went unconscious and Chauvin did not remove his knee until the man was loaded onto a gurney.

Floyd’s cause of death is pending.

After his death, Waters said: “My first thought was, ‘Not again. Not one more killing.’”

“I’m reflecting on all of the killings of young black men in particular, but of course black women too, at the hands of the police and at the hands of these white supremacists.”

“And I’m thinking about the way that the president conducts himself — in a way he’s dog-whistling — and I think that they’re feeling that they can get away with this kind of treatment.”

Trump said he ordered an expedited federal investigation of Floyd's death, and tweeted: "My heart goes out to George's family and friends. Justice will be served!"

The congresswoman continued: “I’m just so sorry about the loss of another life.”

“I think that the officer who had his knee on his neck enjoyed doing what he was doing. I believe sometimes these officers leave home thinking, ‘“’m gonna get me the one today’ — and I think this is his one that he got today.”

Waters said the officer “didn’t care whether or not anyone was photographing him,” and that “he did what he was doing and the officers stood there and watched him.”

She said all of the officers are “just as guilty” as Chauvin, and said she’s “glad that all of them were fired.”

“If in fact you have subdued a suspect and you’re not in any danger at all — and handcuffs are on him — there’s no reason for police to do what these police did,” Waters said.

“They don’t even mention in the report that the knee was on the neck of George Floyd.”

Waters said taking photos and video of incidents between black people and police officers, “citizens are doing the best job that could do,” considering cops “would say to shoot you if you interfere with an arrest.”

“So it’s dangerous,” she said. “They’re showing what is taking place and what we’re finding is that the justice system does not work because the justice system will find a way to protect those officers in most cases.”

“They will find justifiable homicide — and that’s what we’ve got to deal with. You’ve got to deal with the fact that we’re in America with a justice system that does not work for everybody.”

Chauvin and three other police officers involved in Floyd’s arrest and subsequent death were fired, and Mayor Jacob Frey announced them as “the right call.”

“Being Black in America should not be a death sentence,” Frey wrote online. “For five minutes, we watched a white officer press his knee into a Black man’s neck. Five minutes. When you hear someone calling for help, you’re supposed to help.”

He said of Chauvin: “This officer failed in the most basic, human sense.”

Floyd’s death is the latest in a string of racial events around the US, including the death of Ahmaud Arbery, 25.

Arbery was jogging in Georgia in February when a white man and his son pursued him and allegedly killed him.

Earlier this week, a white woman named Amy Cooper called the police on a black birdwatcher, Christian Cooper, after he asked her to put her dog on a leash.

In a video the birdwatcher filmed of the incident, Amy Cooper said: “I'm going to tell them there's an African American man threatening my life.”

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Twitter fact-checker has history of politically charged posts

House Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and White House adviser Kellyanne Conway ripped Twitter Wednesday over who the social media giant has in charge of policing posts after the platform marked two tweets by President Trump with a fact-check label.

“I think if you run a company like Twitter you’d probably first look at what that individual would put out on Twitter themselves,” McCarthy told reporters outside the Capitol in reference to Twitter’s “Head of Site Integrity” Yoel Roth.

Roth, who is in charge of enforcing the social media site’s rules, has a history of politically charged posts. According to Fox News, he referred to team Trump as “ACTUAL NAZIS” and called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell a “personality-free bag of farts.”

“I do not think somebody who would think Republicans are racist, label those who are in the Republican Party equal to people who [are] in the Nazi Party…I’m not quite sure that’s the person I would have being the individual in charge of Twitter determining whether the facts are correct or not, because I think he already is biased in that opinion,” McCarthy said.

Twitter should boot Roth out of his position, said McCarthy, who noted that he’s “concerned about who they have doing a fact check.”

Conway also waded into the issue Wednesday, saying that Twitter fact checks are carried out by the same “people who attack him all day long.”

“We turn around, and we use the same people who are going to endorse Joe Biden for president, reluctantly, are constantly attacking the president and the people around him,” she said in a “Fox & Friends” interview, adding, “They’re relying upon the same people who attack him all day long to, quote, fact check him.”

Conway singled out Roth by name, and claimed that he is “constantly attacking Trump voters, Trump, Mitch McConnell, you name it.”

“It’s horrible the way he looks at people who should otherwise have a free and clear platform on Twitter,” she said.

On Tuesday, Twitter attached warning links to two of Trump’s tweets claiming that allowing large scale mail-in voting would result in a “rigged election.”

“Get the facts about mail-in ballots,” the label states, and links to news articles disputing that voting-by-mail would allow for rampant fraud.

Trump, himself, has slammed the unprecedented move, accusing Twitter in a tweet of “interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election” and “stifling FREE SPEECH.”

The commander-in-chief on Wednesday morning claimed social media outlets are censoring conservatives and threatened to shut them down.

“Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives [sic] voices. We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen. We saw what they attempted to do, and failed, in 2016. We can’t let a more sophisticated version of that happen again,” Trump tweeted.

A Twitter spokesperson said in a statement that the Trump tweets it labeled “contain potentially misleading information about voting processes and have been labeled to provide additional context around mail-in ballots.”

Twitter’s decision to make the move, the spokesperson said, was “in line with the approach” the site publicly outlined earlier this month when it comes to “misleading information.”

The spokesperson confirmed to The Post that Twitter has used the fact check label on other users, but never on another US president or presidential candidate. The site started using the label on May 11.

Commenting on the criticism of Roth, the spokesperson said, “No one person at Twitter is responsible for our policies or enforcement actions, and it’s unfortunate to see individual employees targeted for company decisions.”

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Almost 7% of UK population has had Covid-19

Britain reveals 213 more COVID-19 deaths in preliminary figures as study claims 7% – 4.5million people – in UK have ALREADY had disease but only one in FIVE have symptoms

  • Regular swab testing has found that 79 per cent of positive results have come from people with no symptoms
  • Statisticians say around 133,000 people are thought to have the virus currently, with 54,000 new per week
  • They describe the outbreak as ‘relatively stable’ and its size has decreased on that measure since last week 
  • NHS England said another 185 people had died of Covid-19 in its hospitals between April 10 and May 27
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Another 213 people have died of the coronavirus in hospitals in Britain, officials announced today, pushing the total number of fatalities to 37,673 as a blood-testing survey suggests seven per cent of people have had the virus.

NHS England said another 185 people had died in its hospitals between April 10 and May 27, while a further 14 people died in Wales, 12 in Scotland and two in Northern Ireland. Care home deaths will be announced later.  

Separate data, released today for the first time, shows that one in every 14 people in the UK – around 4.5million people – have already had coronavirus, according to the Office for National Statistics.

The government body today released the first results of its blood testing scheme, which found 60 people out of 885 (6.78 per cent) tested positive for Covid-19-specific antibodies in their immune systems.

It suggests that 4.5million people across the UK have been exposed to the virus – a similar estimate to the 15 per cent of Londoners and five per cent elsewhere announced last week by Health Secretary Matt Hancock. 

Ongoing swab testing shows that 0.24 per cent of the population is currently infected with the disease. This a drop of 0.01 per cent from last week’s update and suggests about 133,000 people are carrying the virus.

ONS officials said it was possible this number was as low as 62,000 or as high as 250,000 – the tests are based on small samples of the population so have to account for a margin of error.

They described the outbreak as ‘relatively stable’ – the same description as last week – and added that about 54,000 people are becoming newly infected each week, down from 61,000 last week. 

More worryingly, the ONS revealed that of the people testing positive for Covid-19 in its nationwide scheme, only 21 per cent actually had symptoms at the time their positive sample was taken. This proves the virus is still spreading silently through the population and potentially tens of thousands of people have no idea they’ve got it. 

In other developments to Britain’s coronavirus crisis today:

  • A Durham Police investigation found Dominic Cummings did not break lockdown rules with his 260-mile trip to find childcare – but he might have breached guidance when he travelled 60 miles to Barnard Castle;
  • The government’s contact tracing site crashed on launch this morning amid complaints it has been a ‘complete shambles’, with workers paid £10 an hour to sit at home and do nothing on its first day;
  • Nicola Sturgeon declared that lockdown is easing in Scotland – groups of up to eight people allowed to mix in parks and gardens. Boris Johnson is due to make tweaks to the draconian coronavirus curbs this afternoon;
  • Matt Hancock performed a U-turn on the prospect of Britons being able to take summer holidays abroad this year as he suggested they may now be possible – despite saying they were ‘unlikely’ earlier this month;
  • The RNLI came under fire following the deaths of three people at Britain’s beaches over the Bank Holiday weekend after it suspended coastal patrols because of the coronavirus crisis;
  • April was the deadliest month on record in England and Wales, according to shocking official figures that showed 88,000 people died across the two countries – double the 44,000 recorded last April;
  • Sandwich and coffee chain Pret A Manger will reopen more than 200 sites for takeaway and delivery from next Monday, with new social distancing measures in place.


The ONS has based this week’s statistics on swab tests carried out on 18,913 people across 8,799 households in England and Wales. It found that 36 people tested positive for the virus from 27 separate households. 

Although people who had symptoms were more likely to test positive (6.78 per cent vs 0.38 per cent), the ONS found that only 21 per cent of all the people who have tested positive so far had symptoms at the time of the swab.

APRIL 2020 HAD TWICE AS MANY DEATHS AS APRIL 2019 AND WAS DEADLIEST MONTH ON RECORD

April was the deadliest month on record in England and Wales, according to shocking official statistics released today that lay bare the true toll of the coronavirus crisis.

Data shows 88,153 people died last month across the two countries – more than double the amount recorded last April (44,123) or before the outbreak spiralled out of control in February 2020 (43,653). The figure, released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), shows the arrival of Covid-19 on British shores led to people dying at twice the rate they would in a normal month.

In London this effect was even worse, with startling figures showing the number of people who died in April was triple what it was in the same month last year.

Counting people who had coronavirus listed as their official cause of death, the number of fatalities nationwide in April was 27,764. But experts say the true death toll of the infection is considerably higher because many patients will have been undiagnosed or their cause of death inaccurately recorded.

The ONS statistics published today show the number of people who have died of any cause, month by month.

In January this year, 56,706 people died in England and Wales, which was high but not unheard of for winter. That was followed by 46,653 in February and 49,723 in March.

April, however, brought a huge spike to 88,153 – 0.15 per cent of the entire population.

The first death from coronavirus in an NHS England hospital happened on March 2 and there were 3,857 during that month. There were 17,774 in April. 

Regionally the biggest increase in deaths between April last year and April this year happened in London, where it rose 197 per cent from 4,102 to 12,175.

It also more than doubled in the West Midlands, which is centred around Birmingham, from 4,527 to 9,932 (119 per cent). And in the North West, including Lancashire, Cumbria and Manchester, it rose by 112 per cent from 5,835 to 12,354. Other regions saw substantial increases but their numbers less than doubled.

The absolute most deaths happened in the South East, which includes Surrey, Hampshire and Kent, where 12,823 people died in April. This was a 90 per cent increase on 6,765 people in April 2019. 

This is possible because there’s a much smaller group of people who have the symptoms – a new cough, high temperature, or changed sense of taste or smell – so every positive test is a greater increase in the proportion. 

It suggests that a staggering 79 per cent of people infected with the coronavirus did not show any typical signs of illness at a moment when they tested positive and thus would have been unknowingly infectious if out in public.  

A separate set of data, not published before, was based on 885 blood tests to look for signs of coronavirus-specific antibodies in members of the public.

Antibodies are substances produced by the immune system when it fights off a certain infection; they are only present in people who have had a disease or the vaccine for it, and can be used to see who has had the illness in the past. 

The tests for it have been analysed by researchers at the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester from people who have donated blood since April 26.

Their finding that 6.78 per cent of the sample had the antibodies suggest the same rate of infection has been experienced across England and Wales, at least. It is reasonable to scale that to the entire of the UK, suggesting around 4.5million people have been infected.

Last week, Matt Hancock announced that similar testing by Public Health England had suggested 17 per cent of people in London had been infected, along with five per cent of the rest of the country.

The true size of Britain’s outbreak remains a mystery because of the controversial decision to abandon swab testing in the general population early on in the crisis before it spiralled out of control, meaning millions of cases were never recorded. 

It also means Britain’s coronavirus mortality rate is very high and not an accurate reflection of how deadly the virus really is.

For example, the Department of Health’s death toll – which is much lower than the true number because it only includes lab-confirmed cases – stands at 37,460. But only 267,000 have cases have been diagnosed – giving it a death rate of around 14 per cent.

Antibody studies, also known as seroprevalence research, are considered critical to understanding where an outbreak is spreading and can help guide decisions on restrictions needed to contain it.

And blood samples taken from around the world have suggested the true infection-fatality rate is between 0.2 and 0.8 per cent. For comparison, flu kills around 0.1 per cent of all cases.  

Other shocking statistics revealed today showed that April was the deadliest month on record in England and Wales.

A total of 88,153 people died last month across the two countries – more than double the amount recorded last April (44,123) or before the outbreak spiralled out of control in February 2020 (43,653). The figure, released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), shows the arrival of Covid-19 on British shores led to people dying at twice the rate they would in a normal month.

In London this effect was even worse, with startling figures showing the number of people who died in April was triple what it was in the same month last year.

Counting people who had coronavirus listed as their official cause of death, the number of fatalities nationwide in April was 27,764. But experts say the true death toll of the infection is considerably higher because many patients will have been undiagnosed or their cause of death inaccurately recorded. 

Last week, Matt Hancock announced that testing by Public Health England had suggested 17 per cent of people in London had been infected, along with five per cent of the rest of the country. This put the death rates, at the time, at about 1.39 per cent outside of London and 1.12 per cent within the city

HOW MANY BRITS HAVE REALLY HAD COVID-19? AND WHAT IS THE TRUE MORTALITY RATE?

The true size of Britain’s outbreak remains a mystery because of the controversial decision to abandon mass-testing early on in the crisis before it spiralled out of control, meaning millions of cases were not recorded. 

It also means Britain’s coronavirus mortality rate is very high and not an accurate reflection. 

For example, the Department of Health’s death toll – which is much lower than the true number because it only includes lab-confirmed cases – stands at 37,460. But only 267,000 have cases have been diagnosed – giving it a death rate of around 14 per cent.

Antibody studies, also known as seroprevalence research, are considered critical to understanding where an outbreak is spreading and can help guide decisions on restrictions needed to contain it.

And blood samples taken from around the world have suggested the true infection-fatality rate is between 0.2 and 0.8 per cent. For comparison, flu kills around 0.1 per cent of all cases. 

HALF OF BRITS ‘HAVE HAD IT’, OXFORD STUDY SAYS

Leading scientists have been left to guess about exactly how many Britons have been struck down with Covid-19, using mathematical-based formulas to estimate the spread of the virus in the UK. 

One controversial Oxford University study – which has since been  – suggested up to half of Britain has had the disease, which would suggest around 33million people had been infected. 

But this would also suggest that the mortality rate in Britain is around 0.15 per cent, much lower than most estimates made by scientists who have closely watched the pandemic.

12% OF ENGLAND HAVE HAD IT, PHE STUDY CLAIMS

Another estimate, calculated by experts at Cambridge University and Public Health England, suggested 12 per cent of England had antibodies – 6.5million people. It claimed the rate was highest in London (20 per cent).

The data – given to the Scientific Pandemic Influenza sub-group on Modelling – suggested that Covid-19 kills around 0.63 per cent of people it infects – a similar figure to other estimates from around the world. 

17% OF LONDON HAD COVID-19, HANCOCK SAYS 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed last Thursday that almost one in five people in London – 17 per cent – have already developed Covid-19 antibodies, adding to evidence that the capital was the UK’s epicentre.

Meanwhile the rate across the rest of the UK appeared to be around five per cent – around 4.38million people in total. This sum is based on 1.53million estimated cases in London and 2.85million elsewhere. 

The figures suggested that the death rate in London was considerably lower – around 0.62 per cent at the time – than it was in the rest of the UK, where it appeared to be closer to 1.39 per cent.

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Amy Cooper once claimed her ex-lover bilked her out of $65K

The white dog-walker who sparked widespread outrage by calling the cops on a black man in Central Park was once embroiled in a soap opera-like drama involving a married boyfriend and claims that he cheated her out of $65,000.

Amy Cooper had a “romantic relationship” with Wall Street trader Martin Priest from 2008 to 2012, “while unaware that [he] was still residing with his wife,” according to a fraud suit she filed against him in 2015.

Cooper broke up with Priest when she learned his wife was pregnant, the Manhattan Supreme Court filing said.

But she still had feelings for Priest when he allegedly reached out in October 2013 and told her that his marriage “was irretrievably broken down and that he was a victim of abuse from his wife.”

Priest also said that he’d since gotten another girlfriend pregnant, that she “had likewise abused him” and that he desperately needed $100,000 to “protect himself and his children from his wife” and to pay his girlfriend “to abort her unborn child,” according to Cooper’s suit.

In order to convince Cooper to part with the cash, Priest allegedly lied and told her that he “wanted to get back together after all his marital and extramarital problems [were] resolved.”

In response, Cooper loaned him a total of $65,000 between Feb. 12 and July 30, 2014, her suit said.

But in September 2014, after Priest’s divorce was finalized, Cooper got a text message from his girlfriend, who said she and Priest were living together and planning to marry, according to her suit.

The girlfriend also allegedly told Cooper that Priest’s “claims of abuse and intent to be with [Cooper] were false.”

Priest and the girlfriend got married the following month and were living with their infant son in New Jersey, according to posts on her Facebook page.

At the time Cooper filed her suit, Priest — who then worked for Daiwa Capital Markets — called her claims “completely salacious” and “absolutely false.”

He also filed a legal response denying the allegations against him.

Cooper’s suit was later dismissed when neither side showed up for court conferences in January and March 2018, records show.

Cooper didn’t immediately respond to a message left with the doorman at her Upper West Side apartment building, where former professional dog-walker Kyle Stover told The Post that he routinely picked up Cooper’s cocker spaniel while she employed him for several years, ending in 2018.

Her lawyer, Priest and his lawyer also didn’t return requests for comment.

Additional reporting by Kathianne Boniello, Elizabeth Rosner and Gabrielle Fonrouge

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George Floyd ‘didn’t have a pulse when paramedic checked several times in ambulance’ and ‘showed no signs of life’ – The Sun

GEORGE Floyd "didn't have a pulse when the paramedic checked several times in the ambulance," a Minneapolis fire department report shows.

According to the document, the crew were "told by several people that the police 'had killed the man'."


On Monday, George Floyd died after Officer Derek Chauvin was filmed kneeling on his neck during an arrest in Minneapolis as the black man shouted "I can't breathe."

The arrest was carried out after Floyd allegedly trying to use forged documents at a local deli.

An ambulance was called and the man was transported to Hennepin County Medical Center where he later died.

The incident report described Floyd as an "unresponsive, pulseless male," and explained that despite medics performing numerous checks on several occasions, they did not find a pulse.

Despite his state, first responders and emergency room staff continued to work on Floyd for almost one hour.

"He still had an outside chance," Hennepin Healthcare EMS Chief Marty Scheerer told the Star Tribune.

"Even if it’s a super long shot, you’ve got to try your best."

But just 90 minutes after his initial interaction with the cops, Floyd was pronounced dead at 9.25pm.

Speaking about Chauvin's knee restraint, Scheerer told the outlet: "I don’t think the paramedics knew what was going on.

"They just saw a split second of what was happening."

Riots and looting have broken out in wake of Floyd's death.

On Thursday morning, the Minneapolis mayor described the incident as "murder."

When asked if he believes that the incident was murder during an interview with CBS, Jacob Frey replied "I do."

"I'm not a prosecutor, but let me be clear, the arresting officer killed someone. As to the precise charge, I'm not going to get into that."

The mayor then went on to say "he'd be alive today if he were white."

"The facts that I've seen, which are minimal, certainly lead me down the path that race was involved.

"I don't know whether or not there's explicit or implicit racism involved, but racism is involved – let's be very clear."

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Coronavirus: April deadliest month ON RECORD in England and Wales with 88,000 deaths – double last April – The Sun

APRIL 2020 was the deadliest month on record for England and Wales after 88,153 died across the two countries. 

The grim tally is more than double the amount of people who died in April 2019 (44, 123) as coronavirus reached its peak in the UK.

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The figures suggest that during the height of the pandemic, people in England and Wales were dying at twice the rate of a normal month.

London was hit even harder, suffering three times as many deaths this April than the same month the year before.

Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows that until now, January 2018 had the highest number of fatalities (64,154).

ONS statistics published today show the number of people who have died of any cause, month by month.

In January this year, 56,706 people died in England and Wales.

The figure is high, but not unheard of for winter.

It was followed by 43,555 in February and 49,723 in March.

REGION BY REGION

When comparing the number of deaths which took place in individual regions in April 2019 and April 2020, the biggest rise was in London, where the figures rose by 197 per cent.

In April this year, 12,175 deaths were recorded in the capital, three times more than the 4,102 logged in the same month last year.

In the West Midlands, the number of deaths rose from 4,527 in April 2019 to 9,932 in April 2020.

In the North West, which includes Lancashire, Cumbria and Manchester, fatalities rose by 112 per cent – from 5,835 to 12,354.

The South East – which includes Surrey, Hampshire and Kent – recorded the highest number of deaths (12,823) in April 2020 when compared with any other region.

It compares to the 6,765 people who died there in April 2019.

EXCESS DEATHS

It comes as new figures show the UK has suffered the highest rate of excess deaths during the coronavirus pandemic among all countries with comparable data.

Britain registered 59,537 more deaths than usual since the week ending March 20,

equating to 891 people per million – a higher rate than any other country with the same quality of data.

The data also shows the UK is the worst hit in Europe when it comes to a percentage increase in deaths across the same period, trumped only by Peru internationally.

Yesterday, the Department of Health revealed the nation's overall death toll from the virus is now 37,460.

The true figure, however, is believed to be much higher, with data from the Office for National Statistics suggesting more than 47,000 people could have been killed by the deadly bug in Britain already.



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